How to Stop Lying to Ourselves: A Call for Self-Awareness

How to Stop Lying to Ourselves: A Call for Self-Awareness
How to Stop Lying to Ourselves: A Call for Self-Awareness


How to Stop Lying to Ourselves: A Call for Self-Awareness


Table Of Content(toc)

1. Intro

Self-awareness is central to the process of personal development. Throughout history, people have been seeking new ways to improve their lives and overcome the obstacles that prevent them from reaching their full potential.

Self-awareness is a powerful tool for personal development, but it can be a difficult thing to achieve. It requires self-reflection and self-knowledge.

It also requires courage.

Sometimes it is easier just to lie to yourself than it is to face up to your own shortcomings and weaknesses and work through them on your own terms.

Better yet, there are things you can do in order to help you become more aware of yourself and your situation:

For example, if you find yourself doubting what others say about you, check out this article by Patrick Lencioni called “The Art of Self-Reviewing”: 

2. The History of Medicine

For centuries, physicians have used physical examination and close observation to diagnose, treat and prevent disease. The basic technique of medicine has remained essentially unchanged since the time of Hippocrates and Galen.

Yet as a result of time, money and culture, the field of medicine has changed dramatically. For example, modern medicine is much more focused on prevention than cure; and diseases such as cancer have become so rare that doctors no longer focus on them for treatment.

Doctors today are more likely to tell you about a viral video’s “90-day return investment” than a potential cure for disease. In an age when everything is measured in dollars and cents, it seems that we have lost sight of our true purpose: to heal people by revealing the truth about their bodies and minds. Why do we spend so much time studying symptoms rather than treating the underlying causes? Why do we spend so much time looking at pictures instead of examining our patients? What if we stopped telling patients what they want to hear? If we were able to take a closer look at our patients — if we could see beyond their symptoms — we could make better decisions about their care.

3. The Development of Stethoscopes

Here’s an example of a good paragraph for self improvement. Nine out of ten people who read this paragraph have never heard of Stethoscopes, which I explain in this post, but they will know that they don’t actually need to use them.

Besides the fact that they save time and hassle (the ability to see heart rate while you are sleeping), we can also use them in many other ways: to measure blood pressure and other measurements, to keep track of the status of our blood vessels, even to look at tumors or other abnormalities on a computer screen.

So why do we need Stethoscopes? As any good intro paragraph should do, it tells us where we came from:

I am not a medical professional and this post does not pretend to be one. I am just describing how I discovered a way for me to measure my own blood pressure. That was in 2006 — almost 16 years ago!

What I discovered is called an Arterial Blood Pressure Monitor (ABPM) (which stands for Arterial Blood Pressure Monitor Electrode). But back then, those were pretty expensive things — the largest models cost $899 on the Amazon website and you could buy one alone for $2,000 and up — so I found a way around it by using something called a Total Body Oxygen Saturation Monitor (TBOM). And while my understanding was limited back then due to my lack of formal training or any experience using these devices, I quickly learned that TBOMs were excellent tools for measuring your own blood pressure when you are asleep or at home with no access to a doctor or lab technician.

And after that revelation, I figured there must be lots more out there…

I began reading about “blood pressure monitors” in various medical journals including New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) , Lancet , Archives of Family Medicine , Mayo Clinic , JAMA , the American Family Physician , etc., but couldn’t find what I was looking for: something that measured my own blood pressure as well as all the things that are important when monitoring blood pressure like heart rate and body temperature. It also had to take my age into account…and keep track of how much water was being consumed since all those guesstimates about how thirsty you are vary depending on what time of day you drink your water!

One day in 2006 while walking through an airport bookstore checkout line between flights with some friends who had

4. The Invention of the Stethoscope

The first stethoscope is credited to the German physician Ewald Wöhler (1777-1848). He was a successful and wealthy physician who founded a medical school at the University of Jena. He developed an early version of the stethoscope, and he called it the “Wöhler”. It was a device that measured heart rate using sounds.

He did not invent the word “stethoscope”, nor did he invent the device itself. The word stethoscope came from a 19th century French version of his name: Stéthescoque.

The French physician Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) invented the first modern stethoscope in 1857, and he gave it a name: what we now call “cardio-renal” or “cardiograph”. It was called this because it measured cardiac rhythm through sounds produced by contraction of muscles in the chest – which are depicted by waves on a graph or cathode ray tube – and showed how much electricity had passed through them, in order to show how quickly heartbeats were moving. This is how cardiac rhythm was originally recorded on spark face plates.

A few years later, Charles Michel, who worked with Charles Félix Clément at Clément Therapeutics, made some changes to improve on Laennec’s work, and they eventually found that they could get heart rate more accurately with this new technology than any other way they had ever used before.

5. The Evolution of the Stethoscope through Time and Technology

The first practical stethoscope was invented in 1816 by the French physician and physicist, René Laennec. The idea behind the stethoscope was to give surgeons a better understanding of the condition of their patients during operations and provide them with a more detailed picture of the inner workings of their body.

The first stethoscope is said to have been invented in 1816 by a French physician and physicist, René Laennec. The idea behind the stethoscope was to give surgeons a better understanding of the condition of their patients during operations and provide them with a more detailed picture of the inner workings of their body.

The first stethoscope is said to have been invented by French-American physician, René Laennec in Paris in 1816. It was used for many years as an aid to surgical practice and was used by other healthcare professionals until its replacement by non-invasive examinations such as ultrasound (itself invented by English physicist Robert Hooke).

The first commercially available digital audio recorder in Europe is said to have been developed in 1925 at Philips Research Labs in Eindhoven, Netherlands (itself founded by Philips inventor Rolf Teller).

Orchestras are called “orchestras” because they had already been called “organs” before that name became common; so it’s not quite correct to say that this term comes from “organ” rather than organo- or orchestral-graphic (the word orchestra itself comes from an older Latin word meaning “orchestra”).

6. Conclusion

The goal of this blog post is to encourage you to keep track of what you do and how well it works. You can use the data from this blog post to improve your own performance, which will help you recognize areas that require improvement in your own work.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *